Issue 12: How AI launders money through art pieces

Why AI Art is not Art; Overview of UX research methods; Analysis of the pros and cons of focus groups and so much more!

Issue 12: How AI launders money through art pieces

Hello, dear readers! đź‘‹

In this issue, among other things:

  • Why AI Art is not Art
  • Overview of UX research methods
  • Analysis of the pros and cons of focus groups
  • Collection of half baked ideas for applications
  • Browser-based AI editor for videos
  • Code generator from Figma and Sketch layouts
  • Metaverse development forecast by 2030
  • Overview of the main design trends of 2022
  • Quotes from "Color. A Natural History of the Palette" book by Victoria Finley

Enjoy reading!

đź“š Book quotes

For this issue, I decided to read Victoria Finley's book "Color. A Natural History of the Palette"

Years later the Romantic poet John Keats would complain that on that fateful day Newton had “destroyed all the poetry of the rainbow by reducing it to prismatic colors.” But color—like sound and scent—is just an invention of the human mind responding to waves and particles that are moving in particular patterns through the universe—and poets should not thank nature but themselves for the beauty and the rainbows they see around them.

What they signified was precious, but what they were was not.

White paint can be made of many things. It can come from chalk or zinc, barium or rice, or from little fossilized sea creatures in limestone graves. The Dutch artist Jan Vermeer even made some of his luminescent whites with a recipe that included alabaster and quartz—in lumps that took the light reflected into the painting and made it dance.

When light shines on a leaf, or a daub of paint, or a lump of butter, it actually causes it to rearrange its electrons, in a process called "transition." There the electrons are, floating quietly in clouds within their atoms, and suddenly a ray of light shines on them. Imagine a soprano singing a high C and shattering a wineglass, because she catches its natural vibration. Something similar happens with the electrons, if a portion of the light happens to catch their natural vibration. It shoots them to another energy level and that relevant bit of light, that glass-shattering "note," is used up and absorbed. The rest is reflected out, and our brains read it as "color.".... The best way I've found of understanding this is to think not so much of something "being" a color but of it "doing" a color. The atoms in a ripe tomato are busy shivering - or dancing or singing, the metaphors can be as joyful as the colors they describe - in such a way that when white light falls on them they absorb most of the blue and yellow light and they reject the red - meaning paradoxically that the "red" tomato is actually one that contains every wavelength except red. A week before, those atoms would have been doing a slightly different dance - absorbing the red light and rejecting the rest, to give the appearance of a green tomato instead.

The use of natural pigments is similarly embodied in the Orthodox teaching that humanity—like all Creation—was created pure but not perfect, and the purpose of being born is to reach your true potential.

When our eyes see the whole range of visible light together, they read it as “white.” When some of the wavelengths are missing, they see it as “colored.

The best way I’ve found of understanding this is to think not so much of something “being” a color but of it “doing” a color.

But color—like sound and scent—is just an invention of the human mind responding to waves and particles that are moving in particular patterns through the universe—and poets should not thank nature but themselves for the beauty and the rainbows they see around them.

Art history is so often about looking at the people who made the art; but I realized at that moment there were also stories to be told about the people who made the things that made the art.

Color: A Natural History of the Palette book by Victoria Finlay
Buy a cheap copy of Color: A Natural History of the Palette book by Victoria Finlay. Discover the tantalizing true stories behind your favorite colors. For example: Cleopatra used saffron--a source of the color yellow--for seduction. Extracted from... Free Shipping on all orders over $15.

đź—ž News and articles

Phone inputs and you: the designer’s essential UI guide

A practical article on how to correctly implement a field for entering a phone number on websites and in applications. The authors of the article explain how to collect international and national numbers in one field, why it is necessary to take into account local input habits, what is the international numbering plan E.164 and much more.

Phone inputs and you: the designer’s essential UI guide—Martian Chronicles, Evil Martians’ team blog
Phone inputs are everywhere on the web, but there are more UI and UX considerations implementing them than appear at first glance.

AI-art isn’t art

Eric Hoel writes about why paintings created by artificial intelligence cannot be considered art. He talks about how AI art will replace traditional art, why we will be surrounded by beautiful but soulless works, why it is not the form that is important in art, but the personal view of the artist, and how the term "art" was explained by writers and philosophers of the past.

AI-art isn’t art
DALL-E and other AI artists offer only the imitation of art

Designing the Avatar: All you need to know

Roman Kamushken analyzed in detail all the nuances of the design of user avatars in mobile and web applications - sizes, colors, states, status labels and notifications, and that's it.

Designing the Avatar: All you need to know
Diving into the Userpic: different events, states, actions, color choices — best practices for UI design. And we’ll show everything with…

8 Rules for optimal use of color in data visualization

Aseem Kashyap offers eight rules for choosing color palettes for graphs and charts. These tips will help you avoid common mistakes and make good data visualization. Each rule is accompanied by a visual example.

Breakdown:

  • Use color when you should, not when you can. For information, not decoration. No one needs a multicolored barchart. But gray with an important category highlighted in color will be much more useful
  • The color helps to group data points by similar values and indicate the degree of this similarity. To do this, use sequential and divergent color palettes
  • Categorical palettes are used for unrelated data. In them, the colors differ from each other as much as possible
  • Use no more than 6-8 tones per visualization
  • Think about changing the graph type. This often leads to the possibility of reducing the use of color. For example, replace a colored pie chart with a one-color bar chart
  • Continuous color gamut works well when the colors are close, close, like on a map. And it is poorly read when they are far from each other, like, for example, small dots on a diagram
  • Choose the right background color. Remember that all colors on a light and dark background are perceived differently
  • Check the colors for how people with color perception disorders see them. This is important and there are many of them
8 Rules for optimal use of color in data visualization
Why color is key for effective data visualization

⚡️ Briefly

Overview of the main design trends of 2022. Metaverses, digital fashion, 3D typography and much more.

Digital Design Trends Mid-Year 2022 | Editor X
The biggest digital design trends that have taken over the industry in the first half of 2022.

Hello đź‘‹

I'm Levi and welcome to the đź”’subscriber-only editionđź”’ of the magazine. Each week I'm picking some of the best examples and articles in the world of design. Join our cozy community of design professionals and learn together.

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